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Address: Liverpool Laser Clinic
20 Knight Street
(off Rodney Street)
Liverpool
L1 9DS
Telephone: 0151 669 1112 Fax: 0845 643 0209

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Laser Mole Treatment

What is a mole?

A skin mole is the most common of benign skin growths. It presents itself  in different sizes, shapes, colours and types. There may be just one or two, or multiple moles distributed all over the body. The colour varies from light tan to deep pigmented (black).

Is a skin mole dangerous?

Most skin moles are benign, however, a dangerous type of skin cancer (melanoma) can arise from or presents as a normal mole. Skin moles should be checked by a mole expert if it shows sudden change in its colour, size, shape or contour. It is also advisable to check the mole if it bleeds or ulcerates.

What are the treatment options for skin moles?

If the mole is suspicious (see above), it should be surgically removed and examined under microscope to exclude cancerous changes.

If the mole is benign (after proper examination by an expert), it can be left alone or removed for cosmetic reasons. Laser or surgery can be used to treat skin moles. Laser can remove the pigment off the mole or shave it off. While surgery can shave the mole or completely excise it.

How does laser work on skin moles?

The laser beam penetrates the top layer of skin to deliver its energy which targets and disperses the pigment within the mole. Different types of laser, with different wave lengths, can be used. The type of laser depends on the degree of pigment (colour) within the mole. You may need more than one session to achieve the desired result. Another type of laser targets the water content of the mole to result in shedding off the top layer of the mole (shaving).

Do I need anaesthesia for laser mole treatment?

You do not need local anaesthesia for de-pigmentation (removal of colour). However, you need it for shaving of a mole.  Local anaesthesia is injected underneath and around mole. You usually need one injection (which will feel like a little scratch).

What is the difference between shave and excision of a mole?

Shave means removal of the top prominent part of the mole to leave a smooth surface at the same level with surrounding skin. The area usually scabs over for a week or so but eventually heals with a faint scar (i.e. the least possible scar, which will be hard to see and easy to cover up).

Excision means removal of the whole thickness of the mole. It usually needs stitches which would be removed after five to seven days. Excision always leaves a scar and it is as big as your mole. The role of plastic surgery is to make this scar as least visible as possible.

Which treatment would suit my mole?

A mole expert can explain the nature of your mole and the best option of treatment.

For more information about mole removal, please visit http://www.sthetix.co.uk.

What is a mole?

A skin mole is the most common of benign skin growths. It presents itself  in different sizes, shapes, colours and types. There may be just one or two, or multiple moles distributed all over the body. The colour varies from light tan to deep pigmented (black).

Is a skin mole dangerous?

Most skin moles are benign, however, a dangerous type of skin cancer (melanoma) can arise from or presents as a normal mole. Skin moles should be checked by a mole expert if it shows sudden change in its colour, size, shape or contour. It is also advisable to check the mole if it bleeds or ulcerates.

What are the treatment options for skin moles?

If the mole is suspicious (see above), it should be surgically removed and examined under microscope to exclude cancerous changes.

If the mole is benign (after proper examination by an expert), it can be left alone or removed for cosmetic reasons. Laser or surgery can be used to treat skin moles. Laser can remove the pigment off the mole or shave it off. While surgery can shave the mole or completely excise it.

How does laser work on skin moles?

The laser beam penetrates the top layer of skin to deliver its energy which targets and disperses the pigment within the mole. Different types of laser, with different wave lengths, can be used. The type of laser depends on the degree of pigment (colour) within the mole. You may need more than one session to achieve the desired result. Another type of laser targets the water content of the mole to result in shedding off the top layer of the mole (shaving).

Do I need anaesthesia for laser mole treatment?

You do not need local anaesthesia for de-pigmentation (removal of colour). However, you need it for shaving of a mole.  Local anaesthesia is injected underneath and around mole. You usually need one injection (which will feel like a little scratch).

What is the difference between shave and excision of a mole?

Shave means removal of the top prominent part of the mole to leave a smooth surface at the same level with surrounding skin. The area usually scabs over for a week or so but eventually heals with a faint scar (i.e. the least possible scar, which will be hard to see and easy to cover up).

Excision means removal of the whole thickness of the mole. It usually needs stitches which would be removed after five to seven days. Excision always leaves a scar and it is as big as your mole. The role of plastic surgery is to make this scar as least visible as possible.

Which treatment would suit my mole?

A mole expert can explain the nature of your mole and the best option of treatment.

For more information about mole removal, please visit http://www.sthetix.co.uk.